Oatgurt Tutorial

by HEAB on June 17, 2009

Hello my almond butter loving friends. If you're new to HEAB, you may like to subscribe to my RSS feed or receive my posts via email. Thanks for reading!

I have received many emails regarding oatgurt.  So, I decided to post a little more info. regarding my latest obsession.

To make it, I use raw oat groats.

Look for raw oat groats in the bulk bins at your local health food store.

Look for us in the bulk bins at your local health food store.

After the oats soak overnight (I use 3 cups oat groats with enough water to cover them), I blend them with a little more water (just enough to help the blending process) for a big bowl of creamy raw oatmeal:

Raw oatmeal.

Raw oatmeal.

I then cover the bowl with a paper towel and allow the oats to ferment in a warm area.  I use my Costco HeatDish to keep the temp at about 80 to 90 degrees.

Love you Costco!

Love you Costco!

48 hours later, my oatgurt is all done.  You can let it ferment longer if you like, but 48 hours is perfect for me.  It forms a hard crusty layer on top and tastes just like sourdough bread.  Honestly, I think oatgurt is delicious.  Even CD likes it.

All done and ready for my belly.

All done and ready for my belly.

I then transfer the oatgurt to glass jars and store in the fridge.

Jars of oatgurt love.

Jars of oatgurt love.

3 cups of raw oat groats makes about 6 cups of oatgurt at a cost of $2.24. Now, that’s a deal!  Take that Fage. Based on the nutritional information for Bob’s Red Mill raw oat groats, 1 cup of oagurt contains 220 calories, 5 grams of fat, 54 grams of carbs, 8 grams of fiber, 14 grams of protein, 4% of your daily calcium, and 20% of your daily iron. Now, what does it contain that regular oatmeal does not?  Good bacteria!  Don’t fear the oatgurt my friends…it contains the same healthy bacteria as yogurt and other fermented foods.  Try some today…or in 3 days because that’s how long it takes to make it, but so worth the wait. :)

Many of you have asked me if you can substitute other grains for the oat groats. Apparently, you can, but I’ve never used anything but oats. This is what the recipe I followed had to say:

You Can Ferment Other Grains

You could ferment any grain, just as people make sourdough from wheat, rye, etc. For pleasant recipes, oats are nice, since the result resembles yogurt. For more anti-candida activity, other grains with more carbohydrate and less fat would be good, since the healthy lactobacilli live on starch and fiber.

I present to you my favorite breakfast of the week:

Chia protein oatgurt with raw pecan butter.

Chia protein oatgurt with raw pecan butter.

Using my chia protein oat bran recipe, I simply subbed 1 cup of oatgurt for the cooked oat bran.  LOVED THIS BOWL…that blob of pecan nut butter was HUGE!

Don’t forget to click here to enter my giveaway for a free one year membership to YogaDownload.  The contest will end at midnight tonight, Wednesday, June 17.

Now, go buy some oat groats!


{ 50 comments }

Graze With Me June 17, 2009 at 9:42 am

Thanks for the tutorial! I’d love to try it but I’m waiting for a warm day when I’m home to make sure it stays hot in the dish. I don’t have a heat-dish…

Love the big blobs of nut butter….the bigger the better. TWSS

Maria June 17, 2009 at 10:16 am

Thanks for that tutorial, Heather! And the nutritional information. The oatgurt must be even better with chia :D . I bought a bag of oat groats the other day, now I just need to find that heater…

Erica June 17, 2009 at 10:22 am

Very cool tutorial! This seems like it would be super to easy so thank you for putting it together!!

the dainty pig June 17, 2009 at 10:33 am

thank you so much for this tutorial!!
i CANNOT wait to try this! I miss yogurt, and I love oats…so I think this is a dream come true :)

Maggie June 17, 2009 at 10:51 am

Cool tutorial. Mine did not come out like that, lol. I think my blender was the problem, not the oats though. I tried it with wheatberries and I think it would have worked, but my food processor couldn’t make it as smooth and creamy as a vitamix could. I let them sit for 2-3 days and they did actually seem kind of okay. They were very watery though (on top) and the water was an odd grey color. I tried to pour the water off and I tasted the oats. They were kinda sour, like yogurt! But they were still too watery and I was nervous about the fact that the water had gotten grey and scary-looking on top… so I tossed them. I only used 1 cup of wheatberries though so it wasn’t a big waste. When I get a half decent blender I’ll try it again :)

Jenny June 17, 2009 at 10:55 am

thats is awesome! thanks so much for sharing, Heather! <3

ksgoodeats June 17, 2009 at 10:55 am

I love the tutorial!! Thank you! I need to pick up some oat groats.

Globs of nut butter are always welcomed in this house!

JB June 17, 2009 at 10:57 am

that oatgurt topped with raw pecan butter looks great! thanks for the tutorial. i really want to try it, but i don’t know if i have the patience to go through the process, haha. you say it’s worth it though, so i guess i probably should!
:-D

-JB
http://cardiovegsular.wordpress.com

homecookedem June 17, 2009 at 11:07 am

The oatgurt looks so yummo! Even yummier looking is the raw pecan butter. Oooooooh my goodness, I bet it’s amazing!!

brandi June 17, 2009 at 11:22 am

mmm…that chia oatgurt with pecan butter looks awesome :)

Shelby June 17, 2009 at 11:35 am

Thank you so much for the tutorial! I can’t wait to make this later in the week =)

polly June 17, 2009 at 11:44 am

Love this tutorial, Heabs!! Love YOU!

Have a wonderful mid week. I am off to the health food co-op and maybe I’ll hunt up some oat groats. I will tell Abbi they are OAT GOATS. Did I tell you the time I fooled her and fed her GOAT milk? She still hasn’t forgiven me…. :P

XOXO

Erin June 17, 2009 at 12:16 pm

This was fun!! It looks so easy, I can’t wait to experiment with some. I still can’t believe you can make oatgurt. Crazy! I don’t know what I’d do without learning about your kitchen adventures.

mayapamela June 17, 2009 at 12:16 pm

I have to admit, at first I was hesitant, but it does sound like a great idea!

luckytastebuds June 17, 2009 at 12:21 pm

eeeee now this is a true raw post!! You really are hands down the queen bee of cool creations and raw foods. I think you should start your own produce line. hahahah SO MANY things that big multi-national companies haven’t thought of yet, and such great ideas too. The only problem for me is that I don’t have the patience to make it all! So in other words, i admire you. :)

P.s. I’m hosting my very own Big Lucky Giveaway and I hope you’ll come check it out!! :)

foodsthatfit June 17, 2009 at 12:32 pm

THIS is why you are so awesome! I love the tutorial, and wondered how you made that oatgurt.

Ooh, BTW, I tried my first kombucha this a.m. YUMM!!!! Thanks so much for the info about it and at the asian store it is only 59 cents/lb. SO

foodsthatfit June 17, 2009 at 12:33 pm

I meant kabocha….geesh, if only I could spell. :)

Run Sarah June 17, 2009 at 1:25 pm

Thanks for the tutorial, that looks awesome!

Kimberly June 17, 2009 at 1:30 pm

Hi Heather,
I just wanted to tell you that I tried buckgurt:) and it tasted TERRIBLE!! I mean gag me with a spoon terrible! It wasn’t so much the taste as the texture that got me. It was all grainy and I felt like I was eating dirt. I am afraid to try regular oat groats due to the fact that they are not labeled gluten free. So, I am trying gluten free rolled oats. I think I read on the website you used that they would work. I hope so! I am only doing 1 cup though just in case. Gluten free oats are NOT cheap. Anyway, I am SO curious about this oatgurt and hope it turns out:)

I am also making my own coconut milk yogurt. I have made it once and it was really yummy–just runny. I use it in smoothies.

Have a great day and thanks for stopping by my blog!

ttfn300 June 17, 2009 at 1:31 pm

ok, so if i don’t have a costco plate that can keep it at 80-90degrees…?? you are so creative, i love it :)

Sarah June 17, 2009 at 1:43 pm

I am so curious about how this tastes. If CD likes it, it can’t be half bad, right?

I’m surprised there was no clever oat quip from him ;)

Nicole June 17, 2009 at 1:44 pm

Awesome!! Thank you, Heather!

Diana (Soap & Chocolate) June 17, 2009 at 2:53 pm

I might actually be intrigued enough to try this…but have no heat dish. I wonder if you could do this at room temperature…maybe just let it ferment another day or two? What do you think?

Briana in Tucson (aka Trilby Drew) June 17, 2009 at 2:58 pm

Heh heh. Just saying the word “oatgurt” makes me laugh. Hehehehehe…

Adi (oatonomy.com) June 17, 2009 at 3:05 pm

Ohh, that good lookin’ gurt! I don’t have a heat dish thing or anything like that to try this out… so I think I’ll have to live vicariously through your posts!

Thanks for the tutorial Heather, it’s great.

carolinebee June 17, 2009 at 3:41 pm

cool cool! I may take it slow and start with the groats :D

traveleatlove June 17, 2009 at 4:43 pm

I would love to make this but would be afraid I might poison myself. . .thanks for the tutorial!

psychoj1 June 17, 2009 at 5:30 pm

Groats sound so cool! Thanks for the tutorial!!
<3 jess

mariposagirl June 17, 2009 at 6:09 pm

don’t have a a heat dish…is that a prob?

I have everything else ready to go thought!

thanks for the tutorial!

jacobc June 17, 2009 at 6:12 pm

Looks yummy!
I’ll have to pass though-not for 3 days worth of work…
This is something i’ll just have to get at your restaurant!! ;-p

Thought this might interest you..
http://www.runnersworld.com/community/forums/index.jsp?plckForumPage=ForumDiscussion&plckDiscussionId=Cat%3aNutrition+And+Weight+LossForum%3a668106477Discussion%3abe6bbb5a-8b5f-4193-8d46-f99d40391006

cheers!

glidingcalm June 17, 2009 at 6:32 pm

thanks for the tutorial mama Heab!! you always get me scratchin the brain and pondering new ideas!

kailey June 17, 2009 at 6:41 pm

now that is a great way to get in protein!! love it :)
thanks for the tutorial!

Pearl June 17, 2009 at 8:07 pm

love this tutorial! thanks so much for taking the time to post it!

Ashley June 17, 2009 at 9:03 pm

Heather, I went in search of oat groats yesterday and no health food shops on my side of the world have them! But I’ve ordered some in, am picking them up tomorrow, and am totally making me some oatgurt. Yayay!

I’m also curious – I learnt the other day that there are white chia seeds and black chia seeds. Which do you use? I’ve only ever used white and am not sure what the difference is.

CurlyTop June 17, 2009 at 9:52 pm

Heather,

Hehe! I’m sitting here watching So You Think You Can Dance and catching up on bloggies. We have a love/hate relationship. For me it’s like watching the Superbowl. I spend the whole hour standing a foot from the tv yelling at the dancers. It drives me crazy… anyways. On to oatgurt.

What a wonderful idea! I wonder if there are any other ways to keep the oatgurt warm as it “bacterializes” … Some sunshine maybe?

With Love,

Emily

Brother Minor June 17, 2009 at 10:08 pm

I just like saying Oatgurt.

Did you know the red coloring in standard strawberry yogurt comes from crushed female cochineal beetles, an insect native to the subtropical and tropical Americas? Also used to color maraschino cherries and fake crabmeat. Yummy. The FDA is going to make them start labeling the ingredient by name in 2011 instead of just “artificial color.” Still think people will by yogurt when it says “Ingredients: High Fructose Corn Syrup and Crushed Beetles.”

I wonder what gives the blueberry yogurt its color?

yogiclarebear June 17, 2009 at 11:32 pm

thanks for your tutorial heather!

MizFit June 18, 2009 at 4:22 am

2 words: VERY COOL.

Many words: I am a child. I love the words oat groats.

please to repeat until you are giggling as well.

as I am.
as the Toddler is.

bhealthier June 18, 2009 at 5:31 am

I have never heard of oat groats!!! Thank you for the introduction and explanation on them! I really want to try them now, I just learned about Probiotics in microbiology and may do my thesis on it so this would be a great food to try!

Alison June 18, 2009 at 6:23 am

That’s really amazing. thanks for the tips!

Coconutgal June 18, 2009 at 8:37 am

Hi friend!! Sorry I have been MIA as of late…. I have barely been on the computer in like a week!! I just caught up on all your wonderful posts. I’m going to continue reading blogs- but I’ll be online less often so I may be commenting less. I do still enjoy phone calls though :-D
I STILL haven’t gotten the book!!! I think it’s not coming :-(

Emily June 18, 2009 at 9:01 am

Love the oatgurt tutorial. I really want to try it, although I don’t have a special heat fan. It sounds like a great deal and worth the wait.

I already entered your giveaway..I hope I win!! I’m trying to introduce as many friends as possible to yogadownload.com! :-)

Missy Maintains June 18, 2009 at 12:14 pm

So cool! Thanks for the tutorial! It looks so good too, especially with the pecan butter!

melruns June 18, 2009 at 12:17 pm

So interesting! Thank you for sharing!

justine June 18, 2009 at 2:12 pm

Ive totally got my oatgurt soaking! :)

Love You,
Justine

Courtney June 20, 2009 at 12:27 pm
fartygirl July 24, 2009 at 7:15 am

Crazy thought.

I live w. my family, and have no way of making oatgurt undisturbed. But I’d love to try. It looks so good!

Do you think I could ferment it in my car? I mean, it’s summer. My car’s always really warm…

Lauren March 3, 2011 at 8:25 pm

I have a question about temp. It’s about 35-40 avg. during the day, with no heat in my kitchn (old house, and no radiator back there).. How long do you recommend letting ferment? OR could I maybe leave them sitting on the radiator to generate the proper heat?

Thanks!!

HEAB March 3, 2011 at 8:53 pm

Lauren, my goodness you must be freezing! If it’s safe to put your oatgurt on the radiator, then I would do that. I usually let mine ferment for 48 hours in front of the heat dish, and it’s warm! Probably at least 90 degrees. It’s not going to ferment in 35 – 40 degree temps. It would probably take 3 days or so to ferment at room temp (in the 70′s).

Lauren March 3, 2011 at 9:04 pm

Thanks! And yes, it IS freezing! My first real winter in Delaware, since I moved up from Florida.. What a change! Inside the house is not as cold as outside, of course, but I’ll try either putting it in a oven-safe dish on the radiator in one of the other rooms, or just putting it in one of the bedrooms, which are warmer anyways. I will post with what I did, and let you know the results, in case there’s anyone else in colder climates (without the awesome heat dish) haha.
Thanks again!

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